Peregrination

“Peregrination” is a rather unexpected discovery.  Seemingly intended as educational entertainment (much like early European and North American 17th or 18th century games), promising advice on how new residents might acclimate to this community and eventually attain acceptance and “prosperity”.  This important find has cast some doubt on many of my earlier suppositions about the history of technological and social development in The Neighbourhood.  The era suggested by the apparent age of the game is in conflict with much of it’s content. I am left to wonder if time might operate differently in The Neighbourhood. Was it indeed created by the “much respected” Nelson Brothers? Are they ageless? It is a puzzling conundrum.

The board game was reproduced and presented “as if in play” for Arrivants

Peregrination, presented “in play”

RULES AND DIRECTIONS FOR PLAYING

Rule I. This game may be played by any number of persons, from two or three up to eighteen, or more.

Rule II. The party playing should provide themselves with a sufficient number of counters, fixing their value at their own discretion – so much per dozen.  Each player deposits twelve counters in the bank, the amount of which belongs to the person that wins the game.  This general stock, with the fines paid into it, will also suffice to pay the different prizes for every lucky point.

Rule III. Each player ought to have a different mark to distinguish himself from the rest.  Players should use a possession, an object found in one’s pocket.  At the onset of the journey, the players also place the nine Interlopers on any symbol made for a place of interest in The Neighbourhood. The order in which the party is to play, maybe decided by lot, or otherwise. 

RULE IV. In play, should any player’s mark become fixed to a symbol where an Interloper is found, the Interloper becomes unavoidably bound to the player’s mark, and, as an observer, moves with the player till a future throw amounts to ten or higher, representing an escape. Should the interloper appear menacing, a chase backward ensues till the two are separated, if otherwise the Interloper is seemingly kind, the unlikely pair proceeds forward until they part amicably. Should the nature of the Interloper be unclear, the player must remain on that symbol until the required number is thrown on a subsequent turn.

RULE V. Peregrination is played with two die. Every player throws both, and casting up the number of points on the dice, he fixes his mark exactly on the same number represented on the symbol he has thus hit, and proceeds further at his next turn, counting from the figure which bore his mark last. 

RULE VI. Should it happen that a person, according to the subjoined explanation of the symbols, must go back, instead of advancing, the Person has no fine to pay, nor prize to receive from the picture to which he shall be obliged to put back.  Fines or benefits only take place, if the player advances.

RULE VII. As every picture subjects the player to certain fines, rewards, or regulations, a thorough knowledge of these rules must be acquired, in order to explain the signification of each picture, which may be done in a few sittings.

RULE VIII. No.50, representing Prosperity, is the end of the game.  Should, therefore, any person who is near the end, throw a number beyond fifty, he must go back as many pictures from the place where his mark is, as he has thrown beyond No. 50.  For example: - suppose a person has his mark on No. 46, from which he has only to throw 4 points more to reach the end, and should throw eight points, instead of the four which he only wanted, he counts back the four exceeding points he has throw from his position at 46, which will bring him upon No. 42; here he waits till his turn comes to throw, and advance again.

EXPLANATION OF THE FIFTY SYMBOLICAL FIGURES